Center of Resource Economics

Description

The faculty and staff of the Center of Resource Economics (CORE) perform research and outreach that seeks to enhance economic development in Nevada, while preserving the natural resource base of the State. Issues addressed by CORE faculty and staff include the management of agricultural and related businesses, the functioning of agricultural markets, the protection and use of natural resources, the performance of government policies affecting agricultural, natural resources, & rural development, and the valuation of environmental amenities.

Affiliated Faculty

  • Thomas Harris, Professor, Economics, University of Nevada Reno
  • Kimberly Rollins, Professor, Economics, University of Nevada Reno
  • Michael H. Taylor, Research Assistant Professor, Economics, University of Nevada Reno
  • Mariah Evans, Associated Professor, Sociology, University of Nevada Reno

Website

Center of Resource Economics

Wildfire! A Survey of Nevadan Risks, Responsibilities, and Actions

Description

This study uses data collected through a mail survey to examine how Nevada residents living in high wildfire risk communities perceive the threat from wildfire to their home and community. This survey was conducted in two stages: the first set of surveys were sent in to a random sample of households in 2006; the second set of surveys were sent to a different random sample of households in 2012.

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Survey Materials

Data

Publications and Technical Reports

The 2005 Nevada Rangeland Vegetation Survey

Description

This study uses data collected through a mail survey to gain a better understanding of how members of the general public use Nevada’s rangeland resources, what their priorities for rangeland management are, what they consider as threats, and how they understand the role of vegetation management in maintaining ecological goods and services.

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Survey Materials

Data

Publications and Technical Reports

The Value of Lake Tahoe Area Natural Amenities

Description

This study uses data collected through a mail/internet survey to examine the general public’s willingness-to-pay for programs that reduce the threat of catastrophic wildfire in the Lake Tahoe Basin and preserve and enhance near shore water quality in Lake Tahoe by combating two aquatic invasive species: milfoil and Asian clams.

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Information Sheets

Sample Survey Booklet

Data

Data Set: Access is withheld by project researchers until results have been published.

Publications and Technical Reports

Manuscripts currently in preparation.